Georgia Sports Blog FanShop

June 22, 2006

Battle Hymn Pre-Game Video

As far as traditions go, this isn't as cool as the opening to Hold That Tiger in Baton Rouge or the Eagle flying down from the top of the stadium at Auburn. But it works for me. And I love it.

Bama pre-game 2003


Huge hat tip to the HobnailedBoot Blog, which is a brand new UGA blog you should keep your eye on.

pwd

18 comments:

Anonymous said...

I got goosebumps on my arms and chills down my spine, damn if I ain't ready for September.

Anonymous said...

That is by far one of the coolest videos I have ever seen. Hats off to you digital camera man.

Anonymous said...

You are correct pwd, that is not as cool as the LSU or Auburn pre game stuff.

Anonymous said...

You can't compare... the traditions are totally unique.

82 said...

How can you call this a tradition when its not even 10 years old?

I get goosebumps while watching it as well but showing a 30 second video highlight opened by 15 notes played on a trumpet is hardly moving for the non avid fan. Motivator, crowd builder? A weak attempt at it maybe. Tradition? No.

Now an Eagle trained to swoop down onto a specific spot when released from a random high point in a stadium filled with 90,000 people chanting war eagle is moving. Even for a 6 year old, they would remember that! Thoughts?

Kyle King said...

I give grudging credit to Tiger the War Eagle for having the highest I.Q. of any living creature that calls Jordan-Hare Stadium home, but playing "Tiger Rag" in Baton Rouge is lame.

The defining lyric of the song is, "Hold that Tiger." Hold that Tiger. That's what the visiting team's band should be playing when the home team is on offense. For the band of the team with the nickname "Tigers" to play that song is sheer stupidity.

As Dawgnoxious suggested recently, we at Georgia have a myriad of longstanding traditions, but few of them are targeted towards creating an intimidating Sanford Stadium atmosphere. Mark Richt has changed that by adding the Dawg Walk, the pregame scoreboard montage, and the Lone Bugler, which I consider one of the most stirring moments in all of sports.

All right, so its history is limited. So what? Dotting the "i" in "Ohio" is one of the sport's oldest traditions, but it's silly and doesn't hold a candle to the Lone Bugler.

The bottom line is that stadium traditions are defined by two criteria: (1) are they cool? and (2) do they get the crowd into the game so as to take the visiting team out of the contest? Georgia's more recently adopted practices satisfy both criteria, so they compare favorably to older, less effective practices.

Unknown said...

Kyle - don't get me wrong. I love the tradition, and it's definitely unique to us.

But the first 4 notes of Hold that Tiger in Death Valley are off the meter.

If memory serves, their fans usually end up shouting L-S-U, L-S-U, etc over the band anyway. Which is even wilder.

I love our stuff, but getting the stadium turned into a buck wild frenzy pregame...that's not really our forte.

pwd

Kyle King said...

You're right, Paul . . . getting the stadium revved up right before kickoff in order to maximize our home field advantage has never been a Georgia strength, but we clearly have been getting better about that sort of thing in the Mark Richt era.

L.S.U. is an intimidating place to play at night (less so during the day) and, if playing a nonsensical song helps the Bayou Bengals win, more power to 'em.

The particular song they choose to play, though, is stupid. For L.S.U. to use "Tiger Rag" (more commonly, if not altogether correctly, known as "Hold That Tiger") as a fight song is moronic.

Imagine if, just prior to kickoff of last year's Georgia-Georgia Tech game, the historic Grant Field loudspeakers had begun blaring the Baha Men's "Who Let the 'Dawgs Out?"

That's how dumb it is for L.S.U. to use that song. The opposing team's proper retort to "Hold that Tiger" is: "We intend to!"

82 said...

All right, so its history is limited. So what? Dotting the "i" in "Ohio" is one of the sport's oldest traditions, but it's silly and doesn't hold a candle to the Lone Bugler.

So what? I honestly dont think the two are comparable in the least as far as traditions go. By definition alone the dotting of the 'i' is 100x more qualified to even be a tradition than the 5 year old trumpet player and video montage.

The bottom line is that stadium traditions are defined by two criteria: (1) are they cool? and (2) do they get the crowd into the game so as to take the visiting team out of the contest? Georgia's more recently adopted practices satisfy both criteria, so they compare favorably to older, less effective practices.

I will have to respectfully disagree. A schools traditions shouldnt be defined by being cool. First it should be defined by the word tradition itself: has it been passed down by generation to generation? Especially for a school thats program is over 100 years old, a tradition has to be old and storied. #2 it needs to be UNIQUE! Either way the most recent additions you speak of [Dawg Walk, video montage, trumpet player] fit none of these. Every team has a '____ Walk'. Even though Ga's is a little more storied than CMR's tenure our 'Dawg Walk' is the least impressive I've ever seen of its type [see UT, Ole Miss, AU]. The video montage? Please, these belong in a basketball arena. Neither of these qualify as being unique or old and while the trumpet player is in fact unique its doesnt get the crowd involved as you say it does. Ga has many traditions, none of which are for getting the stadium loud as PWD mentioned. Yes, the dotting of the 'i' is silly, so is Mr. Two Bits but its 100x better for getting the crowd involved and its definitely more of a tradition by definition. War Eagle, Space Odyssey 2000, the opening of the T, Chief Osceola and Renegade with the flaming spear, We are the boys.....the closest thing we got is the 4th quarter song, which I LOVE!!! Dont get me wrong, I enjoy all of our 'traditions' I just dont think a video montage we threw together in the last 5 years added with a trumpet player should even be called a stadium tradition when compared to the others.

Anonymous said...

Tradition has to start somewhere, who cares if its only 10 years old. As a relatively young Dawg fan (circa 2001), you could have told me the bugle was 100 years old and i would have believed it. For as long as i've been going to games, the bugle has been their. I personally think its great, and it gets me pretty pumped, especially for big games.

Anonymous said...

I love the pre-game battle hymn and video...I get goosebumps watching those old UGA clips before the game. In my opinion, it does get the crowd fired up, but I just don't think any true fan NEEDS any sort of pregame spectacle to get FIRED UP for college football!

Anonymous said...

If you're already in the stadium and you need something else to 'pump you up', then your name is either Anne or Francis and I don't want you in the stadium.

That concept is so foreign to me that it actually made me throw up a little bit in my mouth.

Having said that, I love the lone bugler and I don't care what other schools do.

71 days.

Anonymous said...

When did the bugler start?

Anonymous said...

Speaking of pre-game, when did they stop pulling Uga in on a fire hydrant? Not that I'm complaining...

82 said...

I think the Bugler started in 2001 and Uga was never pulled in on a fire hydrant but they did used to pull a gigantic fire hydrant out in front of the players. That stopped in 2002 I think because for a while up until 2001 you could win an online bid to rid/pull it yourself.

Brett said...

The band started playing the piece around 1989. They started using the lone bugler outside the stadium before they came in around 1995. The bugler in the stadium at pregame started in 2000.

82 said...

The bugler in the stadium at pregame started in 2000
So turns out CMR had nothing to do with this huh?

82 said...

Now this is a 'Walk'!

 
Copyright 2009 Georgia Sports Blog. Powered by Blogger Blogger Templates create by Deluxe Templates. WP by Masterplan